Reaching Out 2 The World

Camel-Backing it Through the Sahara Desert

1 Comment

After a small breakfast our group piled back into the van, everyone squeezing IMG_6388back into their original seats. We had another long day of traveling ahead of us and would be finishing our day with a camel ride into the Sahara Desert!

Like the day before our ride was filled with scenic stops along the road and even a guided tour. Our tour on this day took us through a Berber town where we got the chance to sit down and learn all about the process of rug making. The day was a bit unordinary however because it fell on their holiday. Because of this we received ouIMG_6385r rug lesson from the brother of the women that typically create the rugs. He was incredibly nice and told us that he appreciated the opportunity to practice his English. He also made sure to let us know that it was the women that were able to create all those beautiful rugs and not him. He told me that his skill was jewelry making but that all his supplies were back at his place across town. It’s too he didn’t have any with him because I’m sure he’s great at what he does.

The amount of work and effort that goes into the rugs is incredible and they each tell a story. The meaning behind the rugs is often only known by the creator but if you’re looking to purchase one you can be sure to ask what the symbols mean beforehand. A large rug could take 1-3 weeks to make if they are working at it every day. IMG_6386Seeing the rugs and meeting the locals really makes you think about the whole haggling process. So much time and effort goes into making these custom pieces only to have a complete stranger try to buy it off you for a fraction of the asking price. I understand that they start their prices high in order to still make a profit but I couldn’t help but think that the creators are still getting the short end of the bargain. A few members of our group purchased some small rugs that should make the trips back to their countries fairly easily. I really enjoyed our time in this town and appreciated the hospitality.

IMG_6277When we exited the home we were all shocked to see that the streets were flowing with blood. Today was the day that the animals would be sacrificed in honor of Allah providing Abraham with a lamb to sacrifice rather than his son Ishmael.  When we rounded the next corner to head back to the van we witnessed one of these sacrifices. I apologize if the pictures are too graphic but I felt this was an important part of their culture and not IMG_6275worth leaving out. If it makes you feel any better they use all parts of the sacrificed animal and give 1/3 of the meat to their neighbors and 1/3 of their meat to the needy or less fortunate. It was interesting being able to view the “process” but nice being able to then get in our van and drive away. There are too many parts of a sheep that I’m just not interested in seeing served for dinner.

IMG_6382Our final stop before reaching the Sahara was the mighty Todgha Gorge. Now days there is a small river that runs through this gorge but there must have been a lot more water at one point because these walls tower up to 150 meters on either side of you. It’s a spectacular hike through this canyon and a popular tourist stop on the way to the Sahara. The first thing I noticed upon arriving was the rock climbers midway up this gigantic cliff IMG_6381face. If you squint your eyes you can probably see them in the attached picture. Besides the ridiculous height they were climbing and the sheer drop they faced at any moment, I couldn’t help but think how hot it must be with the desert sun on their backs for the duration of the climb. I suppose they have more urgent concerns at hand though.

IMG_6368Finally, after the longest, most unnecessary stop for lunch (our service was just terrible), we made it to the edge of the Sahara. Our driver told us we were only to bring one bag and that we should be ready to go soon. I guess I wasn’t totally prepared to just bring one bag, as Dan and I had our things sort of mixed together amongst a few bags, but I quickly IMG_6366sorted my things out. Before boarding my camel there was still one last thing I needed to do, I had to get changed into my Sahara Desert garb. When Dan and I met everyone back outside it was easy to see the jealousy on their faces. At least I’d like to think so… because we looked great!

We were each paired up with a camel and each camel was a part of a small caravan of camels. My camel didn’t have a name, and I wasn’t about to walk through the desert on camel with no name… so I named him Wednesday. Wednesday was a great camel and second in line of the first caravan.

IMG_6342The camel directly in front of us looked to be pregnant because of how fat she was. I mentioned this to the man riding her and his response was, “I wonder if she’s thinking the same thing about me!” Gotta love British humor.

Our stroll through the desert was IMG_6348very nice and full of incredible views. The sun was setting and the surrounding dunes looked striking. With the sun at our backs, our shadows lead the way deep into the desert for what was just under a 2 hour ride. For those of you that are wondering, riding a camel is not comfortable. And after the first 30 minutes or so of our ride I could already feel my toes tingling and my groin aching. Despite the discomfort I wouldn’t have changed a thing, besides installing a cup holder on Wednesday. Every minute the sun dropped lower we were presented with different shades of color spreading across the horizon. I hope you enjoy the pictures but I’m sure you’ll believe me when I tell you that they hardly do the trip justice.

IMG_6345The last hour of our walk was lit by moonlight. The moon was almost full and was like a giant light bulb in the sky. Not only did we have no issues of seeing but we could see everything very clearly. Even once the sun was long gone we still casted glorious camel riding shadows on the dunes close by.

I guess there weren’t enough camels for everyone to get a ride so a small group had to drive into the desert on the roof of an overland jeep. By the sounds of their hooting and hollering it sounded like they were having the time of their lives. I did a bit of quad biking through the Namibian Desert back in 2011 and I can vouch for them that it’s an amazing time. It’s best comparable to a rollercoaster ride with no real start or finish. Part of me was concerned for their safety because they were just hanging onto the roof rack of the jeep but I had a feeling they were all sporting the tightest grips they could muster.

When we arrived to the camp we were told that a meal would be prepared for us. DSC_5647We weren’t really told anything else so we all just hung out and waited. As time went by we grew impatient and directed our attention to Light Painting. For those that are unfamiliar with the term, it’s when you decrease the shutter speed on your camera and wave a flashlight in front of the lens. After some practice you can really start to create some neat images. The trick is being able to picture what you’re drawling in your head as you go because you won’t get to see the finished drawling until the very end. Add this to the fact that you onlyDSC_5652 have about 20 seconds and the task at hand is no easy one. For those of you looking to try this, remember that if you’re writing words you’re going to have to write them backwards… and cursive will be your best bet for starting out. Good luck!!

While we were playing with the lights taginedinner was just being served so we joined everyone back at the tables. Our moonlit supper consisted of rice, veggies, and chicken tagine. Chicken tagine is a very traditional meal served in Morocco and this was about the fourth time we ate in two days. That’s not to say it’s not good… I’ve just had more than enough tagine!

To cook this meal you first need your special earthenware pot, aka your tagine. It’s a slow-cook method where you’ll have your meat, and veggies all mixed together. DSC_5654The cone shape helps steam the vegetables and the flavors all come together. This is generally served with rice or couscous and can be for one person or in our case a table of people. The tagine it’s self can just be placed on a bed of coals for cooking and will keep your dish hot for a lengthy amount of time. Cooking with tagines is becoming more and more popular throughout Europe so many people come down to Morocco where it’s considerably cheaper to purchase the ceramic pot.

When we finished eating, Dan and I decided that we wanted to climb to the top of the sand dune behind our tents. I forgot how difficult it was to hike up a sand dune and this one happened to be the largest one around. We took a few breaks along the way but were determined to reach the peak. For those of you that will be receiving the “very special souvenir” you’ll be happy to know we collected sand from the peak of the tallest sand dune in the Sahara Desert! The fact that it’s the tallest isn’t common knowledge but I’m pretty confident in my calculations. From way at the top we could see for miles in every direction. That’s pretty amazing considering the sun had gone down hours ago and everything we could see was thanks to the massive moon. I don’t think I’ve ever seen the moon shine so bright. The brightness of the moon did take away from the star gazing that I had hoped for but I don’t think it really bothered anyone too much because of how awesome everything else was.

The best part about climbing up a sand dune is coming down. I remembered this very well from my previous experience and I was excited to make the run. It took over an hour to climb up and probably under a minute to come all the way down. I was running as fast as I could and loving every second of it.

We were told that we’d be waking up to leave around 5:00 in the morning the following day so most of us went off to bed. A few others decided to climb the dune we had just returned from but I was far too exhausted to even consider doing it again.

Thursday

I woke up around 4:58 to the sounds of silence. I generally wake up just beforeDSC_5688 I’m supposed to, and I think it’s my body’s way of preparing me for the wake up call. I’ve always hated being woke up from a nice sleep so I think my way of coping is to just wake myself up before that can happen. This happens all the time when I’m supposed to be awake at a certain time and it’s never with the help of an alarm. My internal clock has a mind of its own sometimes. Anyway, just because I was awake didn’t mean I was ready to get up, and when I heard no one come by I drifted back to sleep. I again woke a half hour later and then an hour after that and still didn’t hear much going on outside our tent. I woke up Dan and asked him what time we were supposed to get moving and he confirmed that they had told us 5. It was now half past 6 though and everyone still seemed sound asleep. Not long after this, people began moving about and slowly be surely everyone was up and ready to go by 7.

DSC_5728It was bright outside but the sun had still not risen. We walked over to the camels and they again paired us up. I rode the same caravan of camels as I did the first trip only this time I was two camels back. It seemed like the obvious decision to name my new camel Thursday. Once on Thursday we began the long trek back to civilization. Not long after starting were we joined by the sun that quickly jumped out from behind the sand dunes.

Riding out of the desert on Thursday was about as equally enjoyable as riding in on Wednesday.

The rest of the day was spent in the van for a very long drive back to Marrakech. In total I think we were in the van for over 12 hours but I made some progress on a book I had started and was even able to get a bit of writing done. My time in the Sahara, although short lived, was truly amazing. The desert has more to offer than you think!

DSC_5626

Advertisements

One thought on “Camel-Backing it Through the Sahara Desert

  1. I see you don’t monetize your website,you can earn some extra cash,
    just search in google for: ideas by Loocijano

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s